Author: Lindsey Straus

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  Lindsey Straus Lindsey Straus in Prevention & Risk Reduction December 20, 2013
  • Lindsey Straus

    Author: Lindsey Straus is an award-winning youth sports journalist, practicing attorney, and has been Senior Editor of SmartTeams since its launch as MomsTEAM in August 2000. She can be reached at lbartonstraus@MomsTEAM.com.

  • Lindsey Straus

Risk Factors For Sports Concussion: Only Concussion History, Game Action Certain To Increase Risk, Study Finds

More research needed to identify other factors as highly certain to increase concussion risk

Previous concussions and match play increase the risk of sustaining subsequent concussions, but the jury is still out on whether other factors, such as gender, playing position, playing level, style

  Lindsey Straus Lindsey Straus in What's New, Top Stories, Treatment & Management October 27, 2013
  • Lindsey Straus

    Author: Lindsey Straus is an award-winning youth sports journalist, practicing attorney, and has been Senior Editor of SmartTeams since its launch as MomsTEAM in August 2000. She can be reached at lbartonstraus@MomsTEAM.com.

  • Lindsey Straus

More Post-Concussion Help For Students In Classroom Needed

Parents and students concerned about negative effect of concussions on grades

An overwhelming majority of both athletes returning to the classroom after a concussion and their parents are “very concerned” that academic performance will be negatively affected, finds a recent survey.  Majorities

  Lindsey Straus Lindsey Straus in Prevention & Risk Reduction September 6, 2013
  • Lindsey Straus

    Author: Lindsey Straus is an award-winning youth sports journalist, practicing attorney, and has been Senior Editor of SmartTeams since its launch as MomsTEAM in August 2000. She can be reached at lbartonstraus@MomsTEAM.com.

  • Lindsey Straus

Limiting Contact Practices In High School Football: Proceed With Caution, Study Concludes

Until more known about risk factors for long-term brain injury from subconcussive impacts, prevention strategies remain 'educated guesses, at best.'

Limiting or eliminating contact practices in football would result in an 18% to 40% reduction in head impacts respectively over the course of a high school football season, reports a

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